Special Event Screening and Q&A of ÉVOCATEUR: THE MORTON DOWNEY JR. MOVIE

Special Guest Q&A with Director Jeremy Newberger

Before entire networks were built on populist personalities; before reality morphed into a TV genre; the masses fixated on a single, sociopathic star: controversial talk-show host Morton Downey, Jr.

In the late ‘80s, Downey tore apart the traditional talk format by turning debate of current issues into a gladiator pit. His blow-smoke-in-your-face style drew a rabid cult following, but also the title “Father of Trash Television.” Was his show a platform for the working man or an incubator for Snooki and The Situation? Ironbound Films’ ÉVOCATEUR: THE MORTON DOWNEY JR. MOVIE dissects the mind and motivation of television’s most notorious agitator.

Lower the safety bar for a rollercoaster ride through Downey’s euphoric ascent to fame and nauseating plummet to infamy. ÉVOCATEUR features interviews with Herman Cain, Pat Buchanan, Chris Elliott, Gloria Allred, Sally Jessy Raphael, Alan Dershowitz, Curtis Sliwa, and Richard Bey. Never-before-seen footage reveals Downey’s behind-the-scenes fistfights and foibles. Animation recreates the legends of Downey that bounce between executive nightmare and schoolboy fantasy.

ÉVOCATEUR also features an exclusive interview with Steven Pagones, the white assistant district attorney accused in 1988 of raping black teenager Tawana Brawley. Brawley advocate Al Sharpton refused to be interviewed for ÉVOCATEUR, but there is shocking footage of him taped during a Morton Downey Jr. Show commercial break.

Directors Seth Kramer, Daniel A. Miller, and Jeremy Newberger were rabid and now recovering Mort fans. They directed the critically acclaimed, Emmy-nominated documentaries The New Recruits and The Linguists, which premiered at Sundance. – See more at: http://www.magpictures.com/evocateur/#sthash.GwYQxjOk.dpuf
Before entire networks were built on populist personalities; before reality morphed into a TV genre; the masses fixated on a single, sociopathic star: controversial talk-show host Morton Downey, Jr.

In the late ‘80s, Downey tore apart the traditional talk format by turning debate of current issues into a gladiator pit. His blow-smoke-in-your-face style drew a rabid cult following, but also the title “Father of Trash Television.” Was his show a platform for the working man or an incubator for Snooki and The Situation? Ironbound Films’ ÉVOCATEUR: THE MORTON DOWNEY JR. MOVIE dissects the mind and motivation of television’s most notorious agitator.

Lower the safety bar for a rollercoaster ride through Downey’s euphoric ascent to fame and nauseating plummet to infamy. ÉVOCATEUR features interviews with Herman Cain, Pat Buchanan, Chris Elliott, Gloria Allred, Sally Jessy Raphael, Alan Dershowitz, Curtis Sliwa, and Richard Bey. Never-before-seen footage reveals Downey’s behind-the-scenes fistfights and foibles. Animation recreates the legends of Downey that bounce between executive nightmare and schoolboy fantasy.

ÉVOCATEUR also features an exclusive interview with Steven Pagones, the white assistant district attorney accused in 1988 of raping black teenager Tawana Brawley. Brawley advocate Al Sharpton refused to be interviewed for ÉVOCATEUR, but there is shocking footage of him taped during a Morton Downey Jr. Show commercial break.

Something in the Air

SOMETHING IN THE AIR is the newest film by French filmmaker Olivier Assayas. Following his critical triumphs, SUMMER HOURS and CARLOS, Assayas’ semi-autobiographical new feature is a vibrant, incisively crafted story of a young man’s artistic awakening in the politically turbulent French student movement of the early ’70s. In a nod to his earlier film COLD WATER, Assayas’ surrogate Gilles (newcomer Clement Metayer) is a graduating high school student in Paris deeply involved in the counterculture of the time. While Gilles begins to realize that his interests lie more in the revolutions in music and art, he finds himself pulled into ever more dangerous political protests by the people around him, especially his radicalized girlfriend (Lola Créton of GOODBYE FIRST LOVE). Illuminating and elegiac, Assayas’ story celebrates that thrilling, evanescent moment in history when young people could feel revolution just within their grasp.

To the Wonder

To the Wonder, Terrence Malick’s poetic examination of man’s relationships, stars Ben Affleck as an American who falls in love with a woman (Olga Kurylenko) in Paris. He marries her and she moves with him and her daughter to the U.S. When their union falters, he considers becoming involved with an old girlfriend Rachel McAdams. Meanwhile, a priest Javier Bardem contemplates the relationship between God and love. To the Wonder screened at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival.

Mud

A pair of inquisitive adolescents encounter a charismatic drifter with an incredible story in this drama from Take Shelter writer/director Jeff Nichols. Mississippi adolescents Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) are exploring along the mighty Mississippi when they stumble upon a small island inhabited by Mud (Matthew McConaughey), a desperado who claims to be on the run from brutal bounty hunters after killing a man in Texas. According to Mud, his true love Juniper (Reese Witherspoon) is awaiting his arrival in town, and together they plan to make a daring escape. Fascinated, the two boys agree to help Mud slip past his pursuers, despite the potential dangers of doing so.

A Place Beyond the Pines

In Derek Cianfrance‘s The Place Beyond the Pines, Ryan Gosling plays Luke, a drifter who makes a living doing motorcycle stunts in a traveling carnival. When he discovers that he has an infant son, he decides he wants to be able to take care of the child. He meets an ex-convict who knows how to rob banks, and learns from him how to pull off heists. His actions cause his life to become intertwined with a police officer named Avery (Bradley Cooper), who chases after him during a robbery.

Future Filmmaker’s Film Festival

future filmakers festival

Come to

Interested in meeting the filmmakers of tomorrow and catching a glimpse of what we’ll be seeing in the future?

The Future Filmmaker’s Film Festival at The Picture House
April 27, 2013

Screen films from Westchester High School Students 11 – 1:00pm
1 – 2:00pm
3 – 4:00pm

Join County and Film Festival Sponsors as they award the “Chester” to the top three submissions.

Tickets Available day of, at the Picture House box office.
$7.00 adults, $5.00 students, no charge for children 5 and under.

For more information, contact:
Dale Hisiger
914.641.2817 or dale.hisiger@gmail.com

Room 237

Playing April 26th to May 2nd

Many movies lend themselves to dramatic interpretations, but none as rich and far ranging as Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. In LA filmmaker Rodney Ascher’s ROOM 237, we hear from people who have developed far-reaching theories and believe they have decoded the hidden symbols and messages buried in the late director’s film. Carefully examining The Shining inside out, and forwards and backwards, ROOM 237 is equal parts captivating, provocative and pure pleasure. It gives voice to the fans and scholars who espouse these theories, reworking the film to match their ideas and intercutting it with layers of dreamlike imagery to illustrate their streams of consciousness. Sometimes outrageous, always engaging, the words of the interviewees are given full force by Ascher’s compelling vision.

Eslmeralda from the Bolshoi Ballet

Paris, at the end of the 15th century.

Act I
Scene 1: The Cour des Miracles. A Small Square.
Sunset. Tradesmen, members of the bourgeoisie and the common folk make haste to leave the market square which, as darkness falls, turns into the Cour des Miracles – a kingdom of tramps, gypsies and beggars. Gringoire, who has ended up here by force of circumstance, falls into the hands of thieves. Not finding any money on the impoverished poet, the tramps sentence him to death. However, according to their law, a victim’s life will be saved if a woman agrees to marry him. No one though wants to, and Gringoire is to be hanged. At this moment, the charming Esmeralda arrives. Learning what is up, she immediately consents to save the unhappy man, by becoming his wife. Gringoire is in his seventh heaven. They are wedded for four years, the number of shards from the jug Gringoire has broken in accordance with the custom of the tramps, and general merrymaking starts.

The cunning archdeacon Claude Frollo, who burns with desire for Esmeralda, incites Clopin to abduct her and orders the hunchback Quasimodo to take part in the operation. The villains are stopped by a patrol. Captain Phoebus orders the arrest of Quasimodo and that assistance be given to the beautiful Gypsy-girl. Esmeralda is charmed by his nobility and good-looks and profoundly grateful to him. Phoebus gives her his scarf as a memento. He frees Quasimodo at the request of the kind-hearted girl and tries to flirt with her, but Esmeralda slips away.

Scene 2: The Newlyweds. Esmeralda’s chamber
A pensive Esmeralda admires the scarf Phoebus has given her. Picking out the letters of the alphabet which form his name, she dances before this word which is dear to her heart. Enter Gringoire; he tries to embrace her, asserting his rights as husband, but Esmeralda tells him that she only wished to save him from death, and that she will never be his wife. The unhappy ‘husband’ accepts his fate and agrees to partner her in the dances which she starts teaching him. Esmeralda shows Gringoire to his chamber and remains alone.

She dreams of Phoeoebus. Upstage a door slowly opens, and the sinister figure of Claude Frollo appears. A horrified Esmeralda orders Frollo to leave but, throwing himself on his knees, he begs her to accept his passionate love. Esmeralda scornfully rejects him and, pointing to the name of Phoeoebus, says: “Here is the man whom I love!”. Undeterred, Frollo continues to make advances and Esmeralda pulls out a dagger. Quasimodo stays the Gypsy-girl’s hand but, mindful of the kindness she has shown him, he helps her to escape. “Woe to you and a curse on him!”, Frollo threatens and he picks up the dagger dropped by Esmeralda.

Act II
Scene 3: Fleur-de-Lys. A splendid mansion, brightly illuminated for the celebration.
Preparations are underway for the betrothal of Phoeoebus and Fleur-de-Lys. Fleur-de-Lys’s companions gather flowers into garlands and do their embroidery. Enter Phoebus. He is oblivious to everything, the memory of his meeting with Esmeralda gives him no peace. Noticing he is not wearing the scarf she gave him, Fleur-de-Lys is about to reproach Phoebus when he presents her with a ring, and her suspicions vanish. She shows her ring to her mother. Aloise de Gondelaurier announces that she too has prepared a present to mark the happy occasion and gives a sign that the allegorical ballet, Diane and Acteon, should start.

Enter Esmeralda, accompanied by Gringoire and her friends. She tells Fleur-de-Lys’s fortune, and then dances for the guests who admire her gracefulness. At the height of the festivities, when all the Gypsy-girls start dancing, Esmeralda catches sight of Phoebus and realizes he must be Fleur-de-Lys’ betrothed. Devasted, she decides to leave and puts on the scarf. Seeing her present on the Gypsy-girl, Fleur-de-Lys is unable to restrain her tears and flings Phoebus’s ring on the ground. General confusion. Esmeralda leaves and Phoebus hurries after her – the person to whom his heart belongs.

Act III
Scene 4: Love and Jealousy. A chamber in an inn.
Clopin leads in Claude Frollo and shows him a hiding place, from which he will be able to observe the meeting between Esmeralda and Phoebus. Unable to stand the lovers’ sweet nothings and kisses, Frollo throws himself at his rival, Esmeralda’s dagger in his hand. Phoebus falls lifeless to the ground.

A crowd gathers and Frollo, not showing any agitation, mixes with it. He informs the judge that the dagger belongs to Esmeralda and the judge accuses her of murder. Esmeralda protests, swearing her innocence. “I will save you, if you will be mine”, Claude Frollo whispers to the desperate girl, but the latter indignantly pushes him aside. The judge breaks his staff over Esmeralda’s head and throws a veil over her, which signifies the death sentence. Frollo is triumphant.

Scene 5: The Festival of Fools. Square. To the right is the prison. Upstage is the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.
A procession appears headed by Claude Frollo – they are taking Esmeralda to prison. A curious crowd follows them, they are all eager to know what will happen next. A panic-stricken Gringoire runs in. Falling over by the prison window, he sees with horror that the unhappy girl is being tortured.
The square is invaded by a crowd of beggars and tramps who are celebrating the Festival of Fools. Having been elected their king for one day Quasimodo, dressed in royal robes, holds court on a stretcher. An indignant Frollo, tears off Quasimodo’s blasphemous attire.

Esmeralda is brought out of prison and led to execution. She bids farewell to everyone and asks Gringoire to bury her with Phoebus’ scarf. Claude Frollo again offers to save her in exchange for her love. “May God be your judge”, is Esmeralda’s answer to him. She is ready to die and prays zealously. At this moment, Phoebus appears, who has recovered from his wounds. He reveals the real culprit to an astonished crowd – it was Claude Frollo who had tried to kill him, and the condemned Esmeralda is innocent. Esmeralda throws herself into the arms of her lover. The enraged archdeacon whips out the dagger – but Quasimodo, forcing it from his hand, makes short work of him by throwing him off the bridge.

Ginger & Rosa

London, 1962. Two teenage girls – GINGER & ROSA – are inseparable. They skip school together, talk about love, religion and politics and dream of lives bigger than their mothers’ domesticity. But the growing threat of nuclear war casts a shadow over their lives. Ginger (Elle Fanning) is drawn to poetry and protest, while Rosa (Alice Englert) shows Ginger how to smoke cigarettes, kiss boys and pray. Both rebel against their mothers: Rosa’s single mum, Anoushka (Jodhi May), and Ginger’s frustrated painter mother, Natalie (Christina Hendricks). Meanwhile, Ginger’s pacifist father, Roland (Alessandro Nivola) seems a romantic, bohemian figure to the girls. He encourages Ginger’s ‘Ban-the-Bomb’ activism, while Rosa starts to take a very different interest in him. As Ginger’s parents fight and fall apart, Ginger finds emotional sanctuary with a gay couple, both named Mark (Timothy Spall and Oliver Platt), and their American friend, the poet Bella (Annette Bening). Finally, as the Cuban Missile Crisis escalates – and it seems the world itself may come to an end – the lifelong friendship of the two girls is shattered. Ginger clutches at one hope; if she can help save the world from extinction, perhaps she too will survive this moment of personal devastation.Buy Tickets